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DISCOVER DENVER


Discover Denver


Denver is the capital and most populous municipality of the U.S. state of Colorado. As of 2014, Denver is also the most populous county in Colorado. Denver is located in the South Platte River Valley on the western edge of the High Plains just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The Denver downtown district is located immediately east of the confluence of Cherry Creek with the South Platte River, approximately 12 mi (19 km) east of the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is nicknamed the Mile-High City because its official elevation is exactly one mile (5,280 ft. or 1,610 m) above sea level, making it one of the highest major cities in the United States. The 105th meridian west of Greenwich, the longitudinal reference for the Mountain Time Zone, passes directly through Denver Union Station.

Denver is ranked as a beta world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network. With a 2014 estimated population of 663,862, Denver ranks as the 21st-most populous U.S. city. The 10-county Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated 2013 population of 2,697,476 and ranked as the 21st most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical area. The 12-county Denver-Aurora, CO Combined Statistical Area had an estimated 2013 population of 3,277,309, which ranks as the 16th most populous U.S. metropolitan area. Denver is the most populous city of the Front Range Urban Corridor, an oblong urban region stretching across two states with population of 5,467,633 in 2010. Denver is the most populous city within a 500-mile (800 km) radius and the most populous city in the Mountain West and the third-most populous city in the Southwestern United States after Phoenix, Arizona and El Paso, Texas. Its metropolitan population is the second-largest in the Southwest after that of Phoenix.

 

History


 


In the summer of 1858, a small group of prospectors from Georgia crossed the plains of the Colorado Territory and made a region-changing discovery at the base of the Rocky Mountains. Gold. And although not much of the precious metal was found, the mere whisper of the word was enough to start a veritable stampede into the region. It wasn't long before tents, tepees, wagons, lean-tos, and crudely constructed log cabins lined the banks of the South Platte River as prospectors and fortune-seekers poured into the area.

They came from all over the country, traveling on foot, in covered wagons, by horseback, and even pushing their belongings in wheelbarrows. Pikes Peak, a 14,000-foot mountain to the south of the mining camp served as both a landmark and a rallying cry for weary travelers. The "Pikes Peak or Bust!" gold rush was in full force.

 

However, gold wasn't the only way to strike it rich in the boomtown that was springing up on the banks of the South Platte. Those who arrived early enough could simply stake out a claim of land, lay out city streets, and then sell the lots to those arriving after them. General William H. Larimer didn't arrive early but followed the plan perfectly. He claim-jumped the land on the eastern side of Cherry Creek, laid out a city and, in hopes of gaining political favor, named the city after Kansas Territorial governor James Denver. What he didn't know was that Denver had already resigned.

By the spring of 1859, there were cities on both sides of the South Platte. The situation was tenuous and filled with confusion, as tensions between the cities grew and nearly led to bloodshed. Finally, a torch-lit meeting was held, and on the one bridge over Cherry Creek, for the price of a barrel of whiskey, all other names were dropped and the settlement in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains came to be known as Denver.

 

Just when people began settling into their new lives in Denver, a huge gold strike was discovered in the nearby mountain town of Central City. And as quickly as they came to Denver, the fortune-seekers packed up and headed to the hills - leaving the city nearly deserted. Gradually, people returned to Denver as they battled harsh weather conditions in the mountains, figuring there were better ways to make their fortune. They were the first to discover and enjoy the mild, year-round climate Denver had to offer and began growing the city as a trade center.

 

Like any city, Denver suffered its growing pains in its early years. During the Civil War, a Confederate army from Texas marched on the state in hopes of seizing the gold fields. A volunteer army was hastily put together in Denver and, although they were hardly trained and badly outnumbered, they managed to defeat the Rebels from Texas at the Battle of Glorietta Pass, saving Colorado for the Union. And that was just the beginning of the challenges the city would face.

 

A great fire burned much of Denver's business district to the ground in 1863. The following year, a flash flood swept down Cherry Creek, killing 20 people and causing a million dollars in damage. And shortly after that, an Indian war broke out, cutting stage stations and supply lines and leaving Denver with just six weeks of food.

 

The early hardships only solidified the resolve of Denver's citizens and made them more determined to not just survive but to thrive. When the Union Pacific Railroad bypassed Colorado on its transcontinental route, Denverites raised $300,000 and built their own railroad to meet the Union Pacific in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Soon after, the Kansas Pacific Railroad crossed the plains to Denver and, when a major silver strike was hit in Leadville, Denver was a boomtown once again.

 

 

Location


Denver is located in the center of the Front Range Urban Corridor, between the Rocky Mountainsto the west and the High Plains to the east. Denver's topography consists of plains in the city center with hilly areas to the north, west and south. According to the United States Census Bureauthe city has a total area of 155 square miles (401 km2), of which 153 square miles (396 km2) is land and 1.6 square miles (4.1 km2) (1.1%) is water. The City and County of Denver is surrounded by only three other counties: Adams County to the north and east, Arapahoe Countyto the south and east, and Jefferson County to the west.


Weather


Denver lies within the semi-arid, continental climate zone It has four distinct seasons and receives a modest amount of precipitation spread through the year. Due to its inland location on the High Plains, at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, 

The climate is considered desert, although generally mild compared to the mountains to the west and the plains further east, can be very unpredictable. Before the colonization of the city, the landscape of Denver was made up mainly grasslands and desert lands. Because most of Denver and its suburbs sit in a "bowl", the city, often is protected from strong, cold winds. They have come to fall relatively large snowfall in the Denver area in late June and early September.

 

The average temperature in Denver is 10.1 ° C, and average annual rainfall is 402 mm.15 The first snowfall of the season generally occurs in late October and the last snowfall in late April, with an average of 156 cm accumulated throughout the season. The National Weather Service recorded an average annual sun hours of 69% of total solar hours possible.

 

Economy


Denver's economy is partly based on its geographical position and its connection to some of the major transportation systems in the country. Because Denver is the largest 1,000 km city, it has become a natural place for the storage and distribution of goods and services to the Mountain States (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming ). Denver is also and approximately halfway between the major cities in the Midwest like Chicago and San Luis and the cities of the West Coast, another benefit for distribution. Over the years, the city has been home to large corporations in the central United States, making Denver a key point for trade in the country.

 

Denver's position near the Rocky Mountains encouraged mining and energetic to emerging companies in the area. In the origins of the city, the rise of gold and silver joined depressions, played an important role in the economic success of the city. The energy and mining remain central in Denver's economy today, with companies such as EnCana, Halliburton, Smith International, Rio Tinto Group, Newmont Mining, Noble Energy and Anadarko.

Geography also allows Denver to have a considerable presence in the government, many federal agencies with offices in the Denver area. In fact, the metropolitan area of Denver-Aurora has more federal workers than any other metropolitan area except for the metropolitan area of Washington, DC. Along with the many federal agencies come many companies related to the US defense and space projects. The Denver area is home to the former nuclear weapons plant Rocky Flats, the Denver Federal Center, the Denver Mint and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.



Festivals


The Underground Music Showcase


The UMS is known not only for its focus on local talent and the local community  but also for the diversity and crazy high energy of the performances you can see throughout its tenure. This year’s incarnation showcases over 400 local and national act performances, across 4 days, in nearly 20 venues.


A taste of colorado


Over 500,000 people make the four-day Festival their Labor Day Weekend celebration and enjoy the offerings of over 50 area food establishments, 275 marketplace artisans and vendors, six entertainment stages, and educational programs promoting the diverse cultural and western heritage of the region — all for no admission fee.


Denver Beer Fest


Featuring dozens of beer related events at area breweries, restaurants, tap houses and attractions. From beer tastings to firkin tappings, events include beer bike nights, midnight beer breakfasts, beer paired dinners, brewery tours, brewer vs brewer competitions, meet the brewer nights, tap takeovers, beer quizzes, and even a beer street party with bands, brews and food trucks.


Interesting places 


City Park


The park is 330 acres (130 ha) and is located in east-central Denver. The park contains the Denver Zoo and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.

Downtown Aquarium

Boasting more than a million gallons of underwater exhibits that highlight fascinating ecosystems around the world. Downtown Aquarium houses over 500 species of animals


Denver Art Museum


Recognized internationally for its unique manner of interacting with visitors. One of Denver's must-see landmarks. Amazing art. Cool events. We've got it all.


Denver Museum of Nature and Science


A variety of exhibitions, programs, and activities help Museum visitors experience the natural wonders of Colorado, Earth, and the universe. Museum continues to evolve, expanding in both size and breadth of activities, as our exhibits, programs, research, and collections continue to offer opportunities for discovery.